Showing posts with label portion control. Show all posts
Showing posts with label portion control. Show all posts

Nov 25, 2019

How to Squash those Holiday Cravings


Butternut Squash Healthy meals are easy

eat healthy vegetables

Filling up on veggies is a top rule for anyone wanting to eat healthier, yet that doesn't have to sound boring. Check your favorite produce store for winter squashes, including the amusing shaped butternut squash. Like its cousin the sweet potato, it's often overlooked as a starch, yet the orange interior reflects it is rich in beta carotene, which converts to vitamin A in your body.

One cup of Butternut Squash (cubed and cooked) yields 127% of the US RDA for Vitamin A, with 80 calories, 4g sugar, 21g of carbs. Far more favorable than mashed potatoes with (or without) gravy! Factor in the 7g of fiber and you're on your way to RDA daily mark of 25-30g fiber per day.

Beta carotene, as one of the team members of antioxidants, on its own offers many nutritional benefits. Butternut Squash also has ample potassium (more than the benchmark banana) plus 30% of your daily RDA of Calcium. Other minerals at hand include Iron and Niacin, along with Vitamin E.

Winter Wondering

Other winter squashes you can try - (measuring nutrients to the one cubed cooked cup)

  • Acorn Squash has more fiber and potassium, though less vitamin A than Butternut. 9 grams fiber per cubed cooked cup, potassium (896 mg).
  • Pumpkin Squash has both alpha and beta carotene. Alpha carotene also converts vitamin A in the body; Pumpkin Squash has twice as much of alpha than Butternut.
  • Spaghetti Squash is yellow and can even be used as an alternative to spaghetti. Lower in calories and carbohydrates than the other squashes mentioned here, but also lower in fiber. As a pasta substitute though, you'll consumer only 42 healhty veggie calories not pasta carb 200 calories.
Feeling Preppy

Summing it up with preparation, all of these can simply be sliced and roasted, with familiar spices like cinnamon and nutmeg, or clove or allspice. For easier prep you can often buy these pre-cut in stores, though caution on canned variants due to added sugars. You can even puree squashes to make satisfying soups and sauces too. Some folks even suggest smoothies, accompaniments such as apple, nut butter and soy or almond milk.

Hungry for More

Learn more healthy dieting and meal structures from Dr Oksana Aron at WeightLossNYC.com

Sources: Consumer Reports, Pexels

Jul 2, 2019

She lost 60 lbs before her 60th birthday

She’s lost 60 lbs before her 60th birthday — and heading for 20 more

Her kids now in college, she looked at what she wanted to be in this next stage of her life; With most of her 83 pound weight loss goal achieved she joyfully reflects on her healthy regimen with just 20 more pounds to go before her 60th birthday.

Prep School

She’s worked out a solid routine of three healthy meals a day without any mid-meal snacks. Obviously the early weeks were the most daunting, laying down the foundation for what has become her success story 8 months later.

Managing the daily challenges of real life setup some more obstacles in her path: managing the social obligations and even day to day cravings. She worked out some new strategies along the way to making better life habits and healthy choices.

Healthy Meal choices

Some of her magic spells include mashed cauliflower, and wine-free spritzers en verre

Congratulations!

Share your weight loss success story with us like Nancy did.

Images (c) 2018, Cite: Nancy Marland

Dec 1, 2014

Easy Weight Loss: 5 Tips for Portion Control

food portion control

How to Control Your Portions and Your Weight

Portion control can slip up almost anyone no matter how hard you try. How do you know if you're eating the right amount of food? You can measure everything out, teaspoon by teaspoon… or you can try this simple guide.

Portion Sizes Made Simple

Looking for a quick, easy way to know you&rsuo;re eating enough but not too much? Look no further than your own hand! Every time you prepare a meal or sit down to eat outside of the home, you can follow these guides to gauge how much you should be eating by simply looking at your hands. Here’s how to measure your portions with ease.

  • Meat

    A serving of meat should be 3 or 4 oz., but what does that look like? It's about the size or your palm.

  • Pasta

    This carb-packed food should be no more than a 1/2-cup serving--or the size of your clenched fist.

  • Peanut butter

    A quick snack, you need no more than a tablespoon of peanut butter. The distance of your knuckle to the tip of your thumb is just the right amount.

  • Butter

    Go easy on the butter, but what does that mean? Try 1 teaspoon max on your toast or about the size of the tip of your index finger.

  • Ice cream

    can easily pack on the fat and calories, so avoid. A couple spoonfuls to taste; One cup is about the size of your closed fist.

Be in control of your weight

Controlling the number on the scale starts with controlling how much and what you eat. The serving size listed on food packaging isn't always how much you should eat. But with these guidelines, you can easily keep yourself—and your weight—in check.

Power Tip

Need advice on what's really going to help you lose the weight? A consultation with a doctor who specializes in medical weight loss is the first step to safely losing up 10 to 20 pounds a month. Call 718-491-5525 to set your first appointment with Bariatric Physician, Dr. Aron of WeightLossNYC™

Sources: lifehacker, guardyourhealth, image courtesy of apolonia / freedigitalphotos

Aug 12, 2013

How Did I Gain Weight?

6 Ways You Overeat (that you can easily overcome)


You know what’s good for you to eat and you know what’s bad. You may not be the strictest dieter, but you generally follow the rules. Why is it then that you still gain weight? Are you sabotaging yourself or is there something else going on that you aren't aware of? The answers to these questions are surprising facts you need to know to help you stop gaining extra pounds.
  1. Don’t Let Your Senses Fool You

    If you’ve ever told someone you can't smell fast food without gaining weight, you know what this is all about — and there is some truth to that. The sight or smell of food can trigger your hunger and make you crave it and want more of it. Keeping bad foods out of sight, out of reach and far from your olfactory senses can prevent that desire to overeat.
  2. Pay Attention to What You Eat

    Watching what you eat takes on a whole new meaning when you learn that eating while distracted can cause you to overeat. If your mind is elsewhere, it may not register that you are filling your stomach. Be sure to drop the multitasking and turn off the TV while you eat so that your body knows when it is truly satisfied.
  3. Make It Exciting

    Variety in what you eat can lessen your chances of overstuffing yourself. It’s a fact that we make room for dessert, even after having a huge meal because we haven't satisfied our sweet tooth yet. The solution? Include a bit of fruit in your meal (or try as a dessert alternative) to get that fix.
  4. Portion Control

    The larger your plate or take-out container, the more you could potentially eat. When eating out of a larger container, you could eat 25 to 50 percent more than someone else eating from a smaller one. The trick is to use smaller utensils, bowls, plates, etc. so it doesn't appear that you are depriving yourself.
  5. Avoid Alcohol

    Not only can alcoholic beverages add unnecessary calories to your diet, it can stimulate your appetite. Too much of it can impair your judgement — and cause you to overeat. Limiting your intake or steering clear of it keeps those unwanted calories away.
  6. Keep warm

    Colder temperatures make you want to eat more and your metabolism drops (just think how cool restaurants are kept). Regulate your hunger by keeping the temps in your own home warm and not too cool.

Looking for More Ways to Lose Weight Fast

Visit WeightLossNYC.com and learn about our successful medical weight loss program. You can lose up to 20 pounds per month or more under the supervision and expert care of Dr Aron.

Call WeightLossNYC today 718-491-5525

Aug 1, 2013

10 ways you Eat for the Wrong Reasons


Weight Loss Motivation is in your hands

Dr. Aron counsels her patients to be aware of ways they may be tempted to eat when actual hunger or mealtime isn’t the way.

Some of her popular weight loss tips including drinking water to see if you’ really hungry. “Thirst often masks itself as hunger,‘ remarks Dr. Aron.

“Drink water to see if you’re really hungry.
Thirst often masks itself as hunger.”
Oksana Aron, M.D.

Check Yourself: Overeating Traps and Pitfalls

Some of the subliminal ways you may find yourself nibbling when you naught:

  • Coping mechanism
  • Boredom
  • Other People Are Eating
  • Food is There
  • A Special Occasion or celebration
  • You’re Tired
  • Because the Clock Says So
  • Free or inexpensive snacks/meals
  • You Can't Say No to Food Pushers
  • You Suffer from Clean Plate Syndrome

Doctor Supervised Weight Loss Program

Whether you’re looking to overcome a lifetime of obesity or to focus on losing post-baby weight gain, wedding weight loss, or other health or lifestyle syndromes, give WeightLossNYC™ a call and see how you can achieve your weight loss goals today:

Call 718-491-5525

Weight Loss NYC Patient Testimonial

Antoinette tells you what she loves about and her .


Call now 718-491-5525

WeightLossNYC™,

List adapted from yahoo news

Jan 7, 2012

Make Diet Changes to Lose Extra Weight


Gallup’s annual Health and Healthcare survey shows that 52% of all U.S. adults who say they have succeeded at losing weight at some point in their lives said it was due to dietary changes more so than exercise.

How did they do it? Respondents who did lose weight said they altered their diet in the following ways:

1.) eat less
2.) count calories and watch portions
3.) eating more natural foods

The general nature of Americans’ responses -- eating less and working out -- shows that most people find weight-loss success by maintaining good overall health habits, not by relying on quick fixes -- 1% said they had gastric bypass and 4% said they used diet pills/drugs.


Other facts from the study showed that Americans in general still need to improve their diet and get more exercise to combat the high rates of obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

The good news: Even modest weight loss (5% or 10% of total body weight) can improve a person's blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Call 718-491-5525 today to start a weight loss plan that works!

Source: Gallup

Image: Piyachok Thawornmat / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Nov 16, 2011

How Not to Gain Weight at Thanksgiving

Most people haven't a clue how to eat healthy portions for everyday meals let alone at Thanksgiving. Your stomach is only the size of two fists, so it's easy to overdo it with all typical Thanksgiving offerings, even when eating small amounts of everything.

Here's how to fill your plate and not gain weight:

Turkey--no larger than a deck of cards
Two starches (i.e. sweet potatoes, dinner roll)--1/2 cup serving each or the size of a computer mouse
Vegetables--the rest of your plate

Other tips:

  • Choose a smaller plate so you don't fill up on too much.
  • If you're going to be a guest at someone's house and expect a smorgasbord of unhealthy offerings, try filling up on fresh greens at home beforehand so you don't overeat.
  • Select sides you only get to eat once a year.
  • Start eating the veggies first, then the turkey and sides.
  • Go for a walk after the meal. Don't just sit around!
Call 718-491-5525 for a free initial consultation.

Source: msnbc.com

Nov 10, 2011

Consume Fewer Calories, Live Longer

Did you know that a diet lower in calories could lengthen your life? That's what findings in a recent scientific study published in Molecular Cell say, which could completely change the way you look at what you eat daily.

"We are able to show that caloric restriction slows down aging by preventing an enzyme, peroxiredoxin, from being inactivated. This enzyme is also extremely important in counteracting damage to our genetic material," says Mikael Molin of the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.

By gradually reducing the intake of sugar and proteins, without reducing vitamins and minerals, researchers have previously shown that monkeys can live several years longer than expected.

Other benefits from consuming fewer calories include slowing down the aging process as well as diseases such as cancer and type 2 diabetes. The earlier you reduce your caloric intake the greater the effect, researchers say.

Making such changes to your diet as reducing total calories should be done with the advice of a knowledgeable medical weight loss doctor, and Dr. Aron can help.

Source: Medical News Today

Jul 11, 2011

How often do you eat when not hungry?

Are You Eating to Satisfy Non-Hunger Needs?

Dr. Aron admonishes snacking, favoring proper nutritional meals as the signpost to health and happy weight loss. Her prescription for traditional meals favors real table time with place settings and people.
“Building and keeping a structure to your meals maintains a signal to yourself to relax and eat normally, rather than snatch and grab snacking when under duress. [Furthermore] providing a healthy outlet for socialization helps you manage daily stress and foster stronger relationship and communication bonds.”
Dr. Aron, Weight Loss Expert

Honest Food Needs and Fumbles

Many of the reasons people eat do not relate to true physical hunger. Being aware of physical and emotional needs and eating triggers is a step towards addressing them constructively. Dr. Aron can provide support in learning to address physical and emotional needs in non-food ways.

lose weight for your wedding

Address Your Physical Needs

  • Tend to your health needs. Discuss with Dr. Aron if you have a pain or problem. Follow your treatment plan. Take your medication(s).
  • Drink 6-8 glasses of water per day. You may need more on hot days, after exercise or eating salty foods, or based on medications you may be taking. Often people confuse hunger with thirst.
  • Get enough sleep. It has been documented that lack of sleep makes some people eat more.
  • Move your body. Human bodies are designed to move. After years of cutting back on requirements for physical exercise, the current recommendation is to exercise for a minimum of 30 minutes/day.
  • Make exercise fun. If exercise isn't your thing, combine it with meeting other needs such as:
    • Socialization. Bike or walk with a friend. Take a class with a partner. Join a softball league. Learn a new dance.
    • Spiritual. Yoga or walking at the beach can feel spiritually satisfying.
    • Fresh air. Take a 20-30 minute walk—even in winter. Choose a sunny or less cold day, bundle up and walk. It clears your head, leaving you energized.
    • Care-taking. Take your children on a hike. Walk or run with your dog.
    • Personal Growth. Try a new sport. Take swimming or tennis lessons.

Satisfy Your Emotional Needs

healthy eating habits
Listen to your inner voice and work on giving yourself what you need. Everyone needs the following to varying degrees:
  • Companionship/socialization. Spend time with people you love and enjoy; connect with them often. Eliminate (or minimize if that's not possible) contact with people you feel bad or stressed around.
  • Time to be alone. This may include sitting in silence for ten minutes per day.
  • Spend time doing what you love. If you can't do this every day, make some time every week.
  • Find constructive ways of dealing with interpersonal conflict. Take a class or read a book on what ails you. See a therapist or other healer if you need support.
  • Identify your stresses and find coping mechanisms. Try new ways of coping if you still feel overwhelmed.
  • Pay attention to and work on eliminating negative thought patterns. Re-program negative thoughts such as
    "I'm never as good as X"
    into
    "I'm learning _____."

Healthy Lifestyle is Your Choice

Healthy eating is a lifestyle choice. A physically and emotionally tuned in you will create more positive outlets and feel less need to overeat.

Start Losing Weight Today

You can lose 10-20 lbs per month safely and easily under Dr. Aron's care and supervision. Her medical weight loss plan is fast and effective, and backed by FDA clinical approval.

Call for your first appointment, 718-491-5525

May 20, 2011

Dieting Bites

You Are What You Eat…

dieting sucks

Extreme Eating: Do you want some lard with that burger?
In some Chinese-American restaurants customers can choose a dish from column A and one from column B. These meals typically come with soup and an egg roll. The menu items below may lead customers to choose the road to heart attack, diabetes, stroke and/or obesity. They come with the proverbial over-sized salt shaker and a superabundance of fat.

While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not yet set a date for implementation of a new law which will require restaurant chains with 20 or more outlets to disclose calorie counts to customers, many chains’ websites already contain jaw-dropping nutritional facts.

Applebee’s New England fish and chips, as an example, packs almost an entire day’s calories in one fatty over-salted meal:
Calories: 1910
Fat: 137 grams, 12 grams saturated
Sodium: 1350
In addition to the high caloric content, this meal contains the fat equivalent of ¾ cup of mayonnaise and more than half a day’s sodium requirement.

Calorie Guidelines

Federal nutrition guidelines readily available on most packaged foods consider a typical daily diet to contain 2000 or 2500 calories, the lower figure usually for women and children and the higher for men.
Federal guidelines also recommend that those on a 2000 calorie diet, consume:
  • less than 65 grams of fat a day and less than 20 grams of saturated fat
  • less than 2400 milligrams of sodium
Those typically needing 2500 calories a day need consume:
  • less than 80 grams of fat and less than 25 grams saturated fat
  • less than 2400 milligrams of sodium

Do you consider a tuna fish sandwich a typical light lunch? Think again when it comes to Quizno’s tuna melt sub. It weighs in with:
Calories: 1520
Saturated fat: 21 grams
Sodium: 2020 milligrams
A healthier option would be to share it with a friend (or two) and have an apple for dessert if half a sub isn’t satisfying. Ordering a plain tuna sandwich on sliced bread without the cheese would also greatly reduce calorie, fat and sodium content.

Another head spinner is Outback Steakhouse’s full rack of baby back ribs served with Aussie fries:
Calories: 1956
Fat: 133 grams, 56 grams saturated
Sodium: 2741 milligrams

The total fat is comparable to eating nearly a stick and a half of butter!

Sadly these examples are not isolated instances. Restaurants have found salt and fat to be inexpensive ways to make food tastier. Diners keep returning for more.

In the search for new and different enticements, the food industry seems to make many dishes and foods more fattening over time. Fried chicken morphs into KFC’s Double Down sandwich by adding two slices of bacon and two slices of cheese. Creative chefs roll chocolate covered pretzels in M&M’s, nuts and toffee chips, adding calories and fat. Cheesecake becomes gluttonous with the addition of Reese’s peanut butter cups, fudge cake and caramel as in the Cheesecake Factory’s Reese’s peanut butter cheese cake.

Start Losing Weight, Today

woman at self looking in mirror
Choose your indulgences carefully and sparingly. Check restaurants’ websites ahead of time to select healthier options. Limit portions consumed. And find yourself en route to a healthier, slimmer you.

Sources:
Nutrition Chart, What's Cooking America
"Restaurants put obesity on the menu," Washington Post, 10.21.10, p.E1.


Call Weight Loss NYC now @ 718-491-5525

Apr 1, 2011

Eat More Food Without Labels ... Especially Plants

Don't Judge a Box by its Cover

Nutritional labels on prepared foods are meant to guide consumers in making healthy choices. What has evolved in recent years are scores of empty and misleading claims requiring time and perhaps a college degree to decipher which foods really are “good for you.”

Common misleading food labeling includes empty claims that imply health benefits which have no backing. Among these are “Made with natural flavor,” “Doctor recommended,” and “Made with natural goodness.”

Some claims are accurate but don't give the consumer additional information such as pasta packages labeled “no cholesterol” — Plain pasta does not contain cholesterol! More misleading are labels such as on Edy's Dibs Bite Sized Snacks. They boast “0 grams of trans fat!” giving the impression that these chocolate covered morsels of ice cream are heart healthy when in fact a serving contains 16 grams of saturated fat. The Center for Science in the Public Interest recommends that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prohibit companies from boasting of “0 grams trans fat” on products with more than one gram of saturated food per serving.

Don't Believe the Hype

Many labels for fruit-flavored items suggest that products offer the health benefits of fresh fruit when in reality, real fruit is found in small quantities if at all. Gerber Graduates Juice Treats-marketed for preschoolers- depict six different fruits on the package. The product actually contains grape juice concentrate and less than two percent raspberry and apple juice concentrate. The main ingredients are corn syrup and sugar, 17 grams worth, or about four teaspoons of refined sugars per serving.
obesity weight loss scale
One of the most widely used claims capitalizes on the food pyramid's recommendation that “at least half of recommended total grain intake should be whole grains.”[5] Bread, cereal, cracker and even cookie packages often feature their whole grain and high fiber content. Yet these products often have refined flour as the first ingredient and a minimal amount of whole grains. Furthermore, a number of products which claim to be good sources of fiber are peddling fiber not from traditional sources such as whole grains, beans, vegetables or fruit, but from “isolated fibers” made from chicory root or purified powders of polydextrose and other substances. Unlike traditional sources of fiber, isolated fibers have not been shown to lower blood sugar or cholesterol, two of the key benefits of eating fiber.[3].

Kellogg's Froot Loops cereal boxes tout “Good Source of FIBER & Made with WHOLE GRAIN.” (A green leaf adorns the ampersand further fostering the image of healthy food.) While Froot Loops boxes list whole grains among the first five ingredients, the first ingredient is sugar. Ditto for many cereals and cookies labeled “made with whole grains.“

While the Center for Science in the Public Interest continues to urge the FDA to crack down on false and misleading food labeling, consumers can take proactive steps towards better nutrition. Read labels discriminately. When faced with choices among products (such as different yogurts), compare the nutritional facts and choose products with less saturated and trans fats and sugar, fewer artificial ingredients, and more nutrients such as protein and vitamins.

Eat more foods without labels, the foods your great-grandparents would recognize. As food guru Michael Pollan says, “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”
– Healthcare Author, Sima Michaels Dembo

Reference:
  1. Center for the Science in the Public Interest, www.cspinet.org/new/200912291.html
  2. Niman, Nicolette Hahn “Defending 'Foodies': A Rancher Takes a Bite out of B.R. Myers,“ February 17, 2011, www.the atlantic.com/life/archive
  3. Parker-Pope, Tara, “Six Meaningless Claims on Food Labels,“ New York Times, January 28, 2010.
  4. Wikipedia, Nutritional Facts Label
  5. DietaryGuidelines.com

Oct 7, 2010

Fast Weight Loss the Low Fat Way

Fast Weight Diet Program


Trimming the fat in one's diet can be a great way to lose weight,and for those with high LDL cholesterol, it can pack a double punch by lowering cholesterol as well. Sometimes one change yields a huge difference. One patient just cut the weekly block of cheddar cheese out of her diet. After two weeks, she was surprised and thrilled to find that her pants were looser.

In most cases, particularly when high cholesterol is an issue, bodily changes may take longer. The steps below provide guidelines of where to look for unnecessary fat within your diet. Many programs suggest making changes gradually so that they can become part of your lifestyle and not leave you feeling deprived and prone to binge-ing on "forbidden foods." Our fast weight loss program encourages you to take more serious steps forward.
Dr. Aron, Weight Loss NYC

Here are some of Dr. Aron’s low fat diet tips:

watermelon and fresh fruit
  • Don't Be Chicken

    Stick with naturally lowfat chicken, turkey and fish. Limit red meat consumption to once a week or less. Trim all visible fat from meat. Remove the skin from poultry. Look up fat content in fish. While the fat in fish can be heart healthy omega 3s, if weight loss is the goal, choosing lower fat options can speed progress.
  • No Day is Fry Day

    Baking, grilling, broiling and roasting meat/poultry/fish serve up less fat than pan or deep frying. Note that sauté means "fry" in French so don’t be fooled that sautéed foods are healthier than fried dishes when reading recipes and menus.
  • Butter or Not

    Cut back on butter. Lowfat or fat free cream cheese is an option as are some of the butter alternatives on the market. Read the labels to make sure margarine is free of partially hydrogenated oils (transfats). When cooking, use cooking spray on pan surfaces. Sprays come in olive oil, butter and other varieties so you can choose what works best for dinner dishes, baking or the morning omelette.
  • Moo-ve on over

    Switch to low or nonfat dairy products. Lower fat versions of mozzarella, cottage, feta or ricotta cheeses hardly taste different from their full fat cousins, if at all. For dessert, nonfat frozen yogurt, sherbet , sorbet or soft-serve ice cream are generally lower in fat than hard ice cream. Be sure to check nutritional labels though because some brands do have high fat content despite their "frozen yogurt" or "sorbet" label. Experiment with various low fat dairy products to see which suit your taste. Some brands of the same product taste and/or work better in recipes than others.
  • Read the Labels

    Read nutritional labels and steer away from foods containing partially hydrogenated oil, palm oil, coconut oil or lard. These are notoriously high in bad cholesterol. Beware of store bought baked goods which often contain these ingredients. Look for low fat alternatives or bake your own using small amounts of unsaturated oils and fats (e.g., vegetable oil, lowfat yogurt).
  • Be Fruitful

    The healthiest lowfat or nonfat dessert is fruit. Try new fruits in season. Combine them with Cool Whip topping and angel food cake (which are also lowfat) for special occasions. Other lowfat desserts to satisfy a sweet tooth include sugar free jellos and puddings, flavored lowfat/nonfat yogurts and frozen fruit bars (that don't contain cream). If overall healthy eating is a goal, steer clear of products containing artificial sweeteners.
  • Salad Days

    Use salad dressings, homemade or store-bought, that contain olive oil or other unsaturated oils. Mix together with vinegar, lemon juice and/or mustard and fresh or dried herbs to taste. If the dressing has fat of any type, use it sparingly. Many a healthy vegetable salad has turned into a high fat sabotage due to liberal use of dressing.
  • Dining Room

    Restaurant eating can pose special challenges since diners are not aware of all ingredients used. Some basic guidelines: order meat/fish/poultry that is grilled, roasted or baked. If choosing broiled meat, ask them to broil without oil. Request sauce and dressings on the side so that the amount consumed can be limited. Skip the butter on the bread. Ask for lowfat milk instead of cream for coffee. Stay away from soups unless the fat content is known; many restaurant soups contain high amounts of oil or cream.

Free Weight Loss Consultation

Call Weight Loss NYC today and schedule a free initial consultation, 718-491-5525

Oct 4, 2010

New Protein Bars with Satisfying Flavor

Protein + Great Taste = Less Hungry

weight loss protein bars

Strawberry Cheesecake protein bar only 140 calories?

It's great to know you have a new choice with new flavors - ask the front desk on your next visit for a variety box (shown) or buy any single flavor seven-pack for the same great tasty price.

New protein bars with satisfying flavor

Remember that proper nutrition and balance are crucial for your weight loss diet success.

Exclusively available at WeightLossNYC

Ask Dr. Aron if you have any questions about inclusion of any meal substitution supplements or to give us feedback on the items you like best.

Aug 25, 2010

When Salads Sabotage Your Diet



When dining out, salads are the go-to menu option for those trying to lose weight. You think that fresh veggies are healthier and contain less calories than the other carby menu items. But sometimes, a salad is just as bad as anything else on the menu and here's why.

On a recent "Eat This, Not That!" segment on the "Today Show," Editor in Chief of Men's Health, David Zinczenko, showed us that many salads at popular chain restaurants are loaded in calories, fat and sodium, which could wreck anyone's weight loss plan.

Applebee's Oriental Chicken Salad
1310 calories, 93 g fat, 1470 mg sodium
With not-so-great-for-you fried chicken, this salad has the same calories as a McDonald's Double Quarter Pounder, fries and a coke.

Wendy's BLT Cobb Salad and Ranch Dressing w/ croutons

760 calories, 51g fat, 2090 mg sodium
This salad is just as bad for you as 2 bacon cheeseburgers from Wendy's.

Quizno's Chicken Caesar Flatbread Salad
920 calories, 66 g fat, 2090 mg sodium
With more sodium than you need in a day (max is 2000 mg), this seemingly innocent salad is the equivalent of 3 White Castle bacon and cheese sliders plus 3 fried chicken rings!

TGI Friday's Santa Fe Chopped Salad
1800 calories
Need we say more? This meal contains as many calories as a Burger King Double Whopper, fries and chocolate shake.

California Pizza Kitchen Waldorf Chicken Salad w/ bleu cheese dressing
1570 calories, 30 g fat, 2082 mg sodium
This delicious and healthy-looking salad is just as fattening as a Wendy's 1/2 lb double cheeseburger, fries and medium frostie.

You can still dine out and even order a salad every now and then, just follow the tips below for guidance.

Fattening ingredients to avoid
Fried ingredients, tortilla chips, creamy dressing, cheese

Diet tricks
*Sometimes the portions are out of control. Just eat 1/3 of the meal once you've eaten enough healthy calories and take leftovers home.
*Ask for your dressing on side, then drizzle a small amount as needed.
*Choose oil and/or vinegar-based dressings. One tsp. of balsamic vinegar (not vinaigrette) can contain as little as 5 calories!

Source: "Today Show," msnbc.com

Aug 21, 2010

The Hara Hachi Bu Diet



Starvation-inducing diets du jour aren't the way to a better body. What matters most is eating healthy, exercise and lifestyle choices.

There are tricks you can learn to help you along the way. Today, we look at the Japanese concept of Hara Hachi Bu. It's not a fad diet concept, but merely a way to gauge how much food you are putting into your body.

This idea that originates in Okinawa, Japan -- where the average person mainly consumes lean meats, healthy vegetables, soy foods, fruits and whole grains -- is to eat until you feel that you are 80% full.

Your stomach takes about 20 minutes to register that it is "full," so it's a great strategy to eat slowly and stop once you start to feel somewhat full. Think you're still hungry? Wait a half hour to see if you're still hungry, but usually your stomach will be satisfied.

Because of a healthy diet rich in anti-oxidants, Okinawans have 80% lower rates of heart disease and 50-80% lesser chance of breast, colon, ovarian and prostate cancer compared to Americans.

Healthy Eating Tip


If you struggle with figuring out when your body is 80% full, try taking away 20% the amount of food you would normally eat.

Source: Okinawa-diet.com

Aug 8, 2010

Why You Need Water



Drinking water is a must if you are serious about losing weight. A smarter choice than soda or juice, water is pure, and contains no calories, sugars or fat. Not only does it keep your body hydrated to run properly, it can prevent you from eating too much.

These are just some of water's health benefits:

*Increases metabolism and keeps appetite in check
*Improves blood circulation
*Flushes out wastes and bacteria
*Decreases risk of some cancers (colon, bladder and breast cancers)
*Helps your complexion look better

A 2008 study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that people who drank water before meals consumed 75 fewer calories per meal on average. This translate to a loss of 14.5 pounds if you eat 75 fewer calories at lunch and dinner over one year.

The body can't always tell the difference between hunger and thirst, so we often eat when we are actually thirsty. This is helpful to note, especially since it can cause you to overeat.

Be sure to drink enough water and eat foods with high water content such as fruits, vegetables and soups. Usually eight 8-oz. glasses of water is enough for most adults to stay hydrated, but other factors such as being overweight, exercise activity, hot weather and pregnancy can affect that amount. Drink enough so that you are not thirsty and have about 6.3 cups of colorless urine per day. Too much water, however, may deplete your body of too many necessary salts and can have serious side effects. If you are still unsure about your water intake, discuss it with your doctor.

Sources: Huffington Post, CNN, Mayo Clinic

Jul 10, 2010

5 Cool Summer Snacks


Eating healthy has a learning curve, and finding the right snacks to munch on throughout the day can be a challenge. Don't reach for those pre-packaged goodies -- even if they claim to not have many calories. Instead, snack on something that comes from Mother Nature. Not only are fruits and vegetables satisfying and low in calories, they are more budget-friendly, too.

Watermelon
Why it's good It quenches your thirst on a hot day and also reduces inflammation that causes disease while neutralizing free radicals with antioxidants.
Try it as a homemade juice or frozen popsicle (no sugar required!)

Avocado
Why it's good It's rich in vitamins K and B6, oleic acid, fiber and has more potassium than a banana. It's also high in healthy monounsaturated fat and protects against some cancers.
Try it on a burger or make your own guacamole

Cucumber
Why it's good A great source of vitamin C, potassium and magnesium, it can reduce inflammation, keep your skin radiant, lower blood pressure and even keep you cool during a heat wave.
Try it dipped in hummus, on a sandwich or in a salad

Carrots
Why it's good Their antioxidant compounds prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease -- and of course, help your vision.
Try it plain when you crave something crunchy or toss some into your juicer with fruit.

Celery
Why it's good Its vitamin C content helps boost the immune system and it also can reduce blood pressure.
Try it with peanut butter or in a low-fat chicken salad

Source: WHFoods.com

Jun 29, 2010

Sodium Shake-down

sodium intake and nutritional values

“to shake or not to shake?”

Even if you never use a salt shaker at your meals, you may be ingesting far more sodium than your body needs, putting you at increased risk for high blood pressure (hypertension), strokes, cardiovascular disease and, it’s likely, ulcers and heartburn as well.

Yes, our bodies do need salt. It contains sodium which is an essential mineral. The recommended level for most Americans, which includes children, all African Americans, adults over age 40 and anyone with high blood pressure is 1500 milligrams (mg)/day. The recommended level for those who fall outside these categories is 2300 mg. Most Americans consume 3000-8000 mg/daily! Thus, most Americans are consuming two to five times the amount of sodium needed each day!

Weight Loss Tip: Use WeightLossNYC's Free Online Nutritional Calculator

Health experts have sounded a loud warning: Reducing intake to appropriate levels could save 150,000 lives per year, mostly by preempting high blood pressure.

Laudably, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently announced plans to reduce the amount of sodium in restaurant and processed foods gradually over the next ten years. Will this be enough and fast enough to reverse the effects of high sodium on Americans’ health? It’s certainly a step in the right direction but consumers must also educate themselves and make lower sodium choices.

Most Americans due to time and convenience factors will continue to use some processed foods. The key is to consider the sodium content (as well as fat and calories) on nutritional labels. — A typical example:

  • Tuna fish (half of a 5 oz. can) = 250 mg.
  • 2 slices of whole wheat bread = 150 mg.
  • 1/2 can (7.5 ozs) of Trader Joe’s chicken noodle soup = 730 mg.
  • TOTAL = 1130 mg. which is 75% of most Americans’ daily sodium limit

You can easily imagine eating a bowl, instead of a cup of soup, which means 1460 mg. from soup alone with a total sodium count for this ostensibly healthy lunch (it does include heart healthy fish and low fat soup after all) of 1860 mg.! What if you add a few crackers with this lunch (81 mg. for 3 Ritz crackers) or a pickle (280 mg. for a medium one) with the sandwich? Do you feel your blood pressure rising?

Read More Weight Loss Tips from Dr. Aron, Bariatric Physician

Dining out can be an even greater sodium nightmare. Meals, particularly fast food meals, often contain 5000 mg. or more of sodium. Adding sodium can also be a mask for using less than the freshest produce and other ingredients in processed foods. Add preservatives, some of which include sodium and watch those blood pressure numbers rise.

Eat Fresh, Not Processed, Foods

The antidote: eat fresh, not processed. Fresh fish, meat, poultry and vegetables, prepared simply with a couple shakes of salt and desired herbs provides sound nutrition without excess sodium. Add freshly prepared pasta, beans, rice, quinoa or other whole grains for variety and even greater nutritional value.

Eat Fruit Liberally

Eat fresh fruit liberally. Now is the time the Farmers Markets and grocery stores are stocked with an abundance of fresh peaches, plums, melons, cherries. Low in sodium and high in taste, fruits are easy to snack on and don’t pack the sodium that pretzels and other processed snacks do. In the winter when fresh choices aren’t as plentiful, dried fruit in moderation (watch the calories) can replace some of the recommended 2-5 daily fruit servings.

Plan Your Grocery Shopping

As you plan your grocery shopping, think fresh, fresh, fresh! Planning ahead can also save time, a frequent excuse for not eating more healthily. Leftover chicken breasts from dinner can be tossed into a salad or put in a pita pocket with lettuce and hummus for a low sodium and nutritious lunch. Last night’s leftover fruit salad dessert combined with cottage cheese and unsalted nuts is another healthy option.

Read Nutritional Labels

Be creative and read nutritional labels. Look at cooking magazines and websites for healthy menu options. A little planning goes a long way. Also keep in mind that as your taste buds get used to the taste of fresh and not processed, food will taste better, while treating your body better. Eating fresh will also usually mean keeping your calories and cholesterol in check. And your waistline.

Learn more about WeightLossNYC's Diet Plans

Jun 14, 2010

Healthy Weight Loss?

Supplement Your Weight Loss Wisely

People still sell snake oil. They just put pictures of leaves on the bottle now. — Cracked magazine
weight loss supplements

Don't Believe the Hype

Many foods that consumers gobble up, thinking they’re healthy, are actually sugar and fat packaged to look like they are nutritious.

Granola Bars

Prime example: granola bars which may have as much fat, ounce per ounce, as a Snickers® candy bar.

Protein shakes

Protein shakes meant for bodybuilders doing heavy lifting not for folks sitting in front of computers all day. In addition to the protein, they can contain LOTS of sugar and fat too.

Protein Bars

Protein bars also fall into this category. They should replace meals, not supplement them, for more sedentary people.

Vitamin Waters

Water is the best drink for you, right? Not when 32 grams of sugar are also crammed into the bottle. Even a full size Snickers® candy bar has less sugar — 30 grams of sugar! Stick with the plain stuff to hydrate your way through a healthy summer.

Your best defense: Read the nutritional labels

They’ll tell you calorie, fat, sugar and protein content. They’ll also indicate where there are enough vitamins to count towards your daily requirements. Knowledge is power!

Get Smart

Work with WeightLossNYC to build the best weight loss plan for you. Call today for your first appointment & Start Losing Weight — Today!

May 26, 2010

Healthy Portions = Healthy Weight


Portion size can make or break your diet, but the right size still eludes many.

Americans have become obese at alarming rates since the 1970s, as more than 66 percent of our population is now either overweight or obese. What's changed since then? Portion size, for starters. "Super-sized" options abound for virtually anything you eat or drink, making it too easy to consume more than you need.

These are just some examples of how portion sizes have grown over the past 20 years:

Two pizza slices
Then: 500 calories
Now: 850 calories

Coffee w/ milk and sugar
Then: 8 oz., 45 calories
Now: 16 oz., 330 calories

Movie popcorn
Then: 5 cups, 270 calories
Now: tub, 630 calories

Bagel
Then: 3-in., 140 calories
Now: 5-6 in., 350 calories

Cheeseburger
Then: 333 calories
Now: 590 calories

Coca-Cola
Then: 8 oz., 97 calories
Now: 20 oz., 242 calories

Portion sizes have changed, but healthy eating hasn't. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute says that a bowl of cereal should only be the size of your fist (likewise for a baked potato), a cup of salad should be no larger than the size of a baseball and a healthy serving of meat is 3 oz. (or about as large as a deck of cards). Once you learn the tricks to control your portions, you'll also be able to better control your dress or pants size.

--DivineCaroline.com, NHLBI