Oksana Aron, MD

Dr Aron Medical Weight Loss Diet Programs

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Weight Loss Motivation. Weight Loss Results.

Dr. Aron brings you fun and important weight loss tips, exciting diet recipes, medical weight loss breakthroughs, and a steady source of weight loss motivation.

Her medical weight loss program provides real results for overweight and obese persons seeking non-surgical medical treatment, with lasting results.

WeightLossNYC, Dr Aron Medical Weight Loss Center

Call now — 718-491-5525

What Type of Diet is Right for You? Mediterranean? Ketogenic? Vegan?

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Oct 13, 2018
Green Vegetable

Fact not Fad

There is no shortage of diet names to confuse us all. We want to be healthy and want to go beyond just a gimmick or trend. Dr Aron surely knows fact from fad, she prescribes diets to all her patients. So here are some simple facts about what makes a diet healthy, and why it should matter to you.

“Diet is the single most significant risk factor for disability and premature death.” — American Family Physician

Well … That seems like a pretty good reason to care about your diet.

be happy and healthy


Diet Characteristics

Across the board evaluation of clinically viable food plans favor higher percentage of vegetables, limiting sugars, and replacing processed grains with whole grain sources. Important to note is that juices are not considered a proper replacement for real fruits and vegetables due to their higher glycemic index and loss of healthy fiber in processing. Likewise, potatoes fall into the carb camp not as veggies.

Making the proper substitutions can be challenging yet the clinical outcomes are meaningful in that your diet can push back on risk factors for cardio-vascular diseases, high blood pressure, obesity, and of course, diabetes.


healthy lifestyle choices


What to do next

Fundamentally, maintaining proper nutrition is key, via proper balanced diet and appropriate food choices. Dr Aron can advise you of any items you are not sure if suitable for your weight loss progress as well as for your life.

Visit her medical practice at WeightLossNYC.com to learn more.






Sources: American Family Physician; Twitter author jokes

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How much does it cost to be Overweight?

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Aug 1, 2014

Obesity Medical Expenses Cost Billions Each Year

Obesity not only takes a toll on your health but your wallet as well, as it costs $147 billion each year in direct medical costs and nearly 10 percent of all medical spending in the U.S.

Roughly one in three Americans are considered obese. An obese person could spend as much as $4,870 per year on health care expenses on Medicare, which is about 41 percent more than a normal weight person spends at $3,400.

Prescription drugs are the majority of medical expenses and can cost an obese person upwards of $1,300 a year, which is 80 percent more than the $700 an average weight person spends.

“…the clear link between rising rates of obesity and increasing medical costs is alarming, but not unexpected,” …the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation said in a statement. “Obesity is the driver of so many chronic conditions — heart disease, diabetes, cancer — that generate the exorbitant costs that are crushing our health-care system,” she said.

“The only way to show real savings in health expenditures in the future is through efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity and related health conditions,” study author [and] director, RTI Public Health Economics Program, said.

Improve Your Health Today

Dr Aron can help you save money by helping you improve your health and wellness. Visit WeightLossNYC.com to learn about her medical weight loss program.

heart health and obesity

Sources: HealthDay News

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Qsymia, Another Anti-Obesity Diet Drug Approved by FDA

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Jul 26, 2012
women weight loss

New weight loss pill


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration just recently approved another prescription medical weight loss drug, Qsymia (previously named Qnexa), which is said to produce significant weight loss.

Qsymia: The facts


In clinical trials, patients experienced a more dramatic weight loss with Qsymia than with Belviq, another weight loss drug that recently got FDA approval. Patients in the trial went from an average of 227 pounds to 204 pounds while on Qsymia. Those on Belviq went from an average of 220 to 207.

Meant for obese or overweight patients with a BMI of 27 or greater who suffer from hypertension and diabetes, Qsymia's benefits include lowered blood pressure and cholesterol levels in obese people and less chance of getting Type 2 diabetes while on the drug. It also contains phentermine, an appetite suppressant.

Possible side effects include an increased heart rate and birth defects when taken by pregnant women. Qsymia is expected to be available soon, while its manufacturer, Vivus, will conduct a study on its cardiovascular effects, as required by the FDA.

Consult with Dr Aron

Speak with Dr. Aron before trying any weight loss pills to find what's safe and works best for you.

Call WeightLossNYC™ today at 718-491-5525 for your first appointment with a knowledgeable medical weight loss physician, Oksana Aron MD.



Source: cnn.com

Image: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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One Thing You Should Give Up to Lose Weight

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC May 4, 2012


Fast food = fat food

Let's start off by calling fast food exactly what it is: fat food. The only thing is, there's very little food in fast food, as it has no nourishment. It's something that you shouldn't merely cut back on -- it's something that has no place in your diet. Read on for some convincing details that may change your mind if it's a weakness for you.

The facts

What's in fast food? A lot of fat, calories and sodium -- far more than you need. In a recent study, the average fast food lunch contained 827 calories, when the average person only needs about 1,800 to 2,000 calories per day.

The non-ingredients in fast food

Not all foods are created equal, especially when we're talking about fast food. A recent OrganicAuthority.com article by Kimberley Stakal makes a sobering point about not getting what you think you'll be getting at fast food restaurants.

Take scrambled eggs from McDonald's, for instance:

They’re just eggs, right? Sure, if by “just eggs” you’re also including sodium acid pyrophosphate, citric acid, monosodium phosphate and nisin (all preservatives), as well as liquid margarine (which is made from liquid soybean oil, water, partially hydrogenated cottonseed and soybean oils [trans fats], salt, hydrogenated cottonseed oil [trans fats], soy lecithin, mono- and diglycerides, sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate [preservatives], artificial flavor, citric acid, vitamin A palmitate and beta carotene [color]).


Someone trying to eat right may think, "I'll just buy some scrambled eggs at McDonald's while on the go. Eggs are good for you, aren't they? At least it's not a cheeseburger and fries." But then you're getting a whole lot of other non-ingredients with those eggs that will only cause you to gain unhealthy weight, up your blood pressure and put you at risk for a whole host of other ailments. Choosing one fast food item over another still isn't helping you.

The verdict?

Avoid fast food at all costs. What you think is cheap and convenient now will only cost you far more in the long run, including your health and medical costs. Remember: fast = fat!

Eat, think and be healthy. Learn how to lose 10 to 20 pounds or more per month. Give us a call at 718-491-5525 to schedule your first appointment.

Source: OrganicAuthority.com

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Banish That Belly Bloat

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Mar 3, 2012

What floats your bloat??

Knowing which healthy foods help you lose weight isn't good enough — you also need to know which types of food make you bloated and appear heavier than you really are so you can steer clear of them.


What’s the main culprit of a bloated belly? Sodium. You know, having too much salt in your diet, which typically comes from processed and/or junk food in your diet.

The top 10 sources of food that contribute to belly bloat, according to The Centers for Disease Control, are as follows:
  1. bread
  2. cold cuts and cured meats
  3. pizza
  4. poultry
  5. soups
  6. fast-food burgers and sandwiches
  7. cheese
  8. pasta
  9. meatloaf and other meat dishes
  10. salty snacks (potato chips, pretzels)

Not only can many of these foods add pounds, but they can make you look bloated and larger than your true size. Additionally, too much salt intake can lead to other health problems such as high blood pressure. By avoiding the less healthy foods in this list or at least limiting your intake, you can keep the weight off and the bloating away. Also, be sure to eat mainly whole, natural foods that aren’t processed for a healthy weight and size.

Tips for cutting down sodium

  • Season your food with spices instead of salt
  • When a recipe calls for salt and you are already using other ingredients such as canned tomatoes that contain salt, leave it out
  • Select foods that are "low-salt" or "no-salt." But be careful: foods marked as "reduced sodium" may still contain a lot of it. Aim for no more than 200 mg of sodium per serving.

Call WeightLossNYC™ for your free weight loss consultation at 718-491-5525

Today can be the beginning of a healthier you.


WeightLossNYC™ website: http://WeightLossNYC.com

Source: shine.yahoo.com; mayoclinic.com

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Phentermine safer than Sibutramine

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Oct 9, 2010

Weight Loss Medical News

In previous articles, we've expressed concerns for misleading and dangerous over-the-counter products attempting to market themselves as weight loss remedies.phentermine

Heart Health Risk

The diet medication Meridia is being withdrawn from the market because it can increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes. We are proud to say that we have never used Meridia in our weight loss program because the risks of heart attack and stroke; with very modest weight loss benefit relative to this high risk. Meridia, also known as sibutramine, has been controversial since its approval in 1997 because it raises blood pressure and heart rate.

Slimming Supplements

The FDA also warned consumers to avoid using Slimming Beauty Bitter Orange Slimming Capsules, a nutritional supplement sold over the Internet. The agency said the capsules contained excessive amounts of sibutramine, the main ingredient in Meridia. »

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Sugar-coating High Fructose Corn Syrup

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Sep 23, 2010

Savvy consumers have increasingly become aware of what's in the foods they eat, including the health risks of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Food makers have caught onto this and now want to change the name of HFCS to simply "corn sugar" so consumers don't perceive it negatively. But is that strategic move in the best interest of the shopper trying to buy healthy foods?

HFCS is found in sodas, candy and many processed foods. A combination of fructose and glucose, it's used as a sweetener and preservative. It's also been blamed for being a major cause of the obesity (which also puts you at risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and coronary artery disease) epidemic in the United States.

Doctors advise against all types of sugar -- HFCS, sucrose, fructose and glucose -- which have the ability to make you gain weight. They are all believed to be equally harmful when absorbed into the bloodstream. Some lab rats in studies have shown to gain more weight with HFCS compared to other sugars, but sometimes they did not.

Limiting your intake of all kinds of sugar and sweeteners is recommended to avoid unnecessary weight gain. Read those nutrition labels and look out for sugar content. And soon enough, you may have to look out for one more -- corn sugar.

Sources: NYTimes.com, MayoClinic.com

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5 Cool Summer Snacks

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Jul 10, 2010

Eating healthy has a learning curve, and finding the right snacks to munch on throughout the day can be a challenge. Don't reach for those pre-packaged goodies -- even if they claim to not have many calories. Instead, snack on something that comes from Mother Nature. Not only are fruits and vegetables satisfying and low in calories, they are more budget-friendly, too.

Watermelon
Why it's good It quenches your thirst on a hot day and also reduces inflammation that causes disease while neutralizing free radicals with antioxidants.
Try it as a homemade juice or frozen popsicle (no sugar required!)

Avocado
Why it's good It's rich in vitamins K and B6, oleic acid, fiber and has more potassium than a banana. It's also high in healthy monounsaturated fat and protects against some cancers.
Try it on a burger or make your own guacamole

Cucumber
Why it's good A great source of vitamin C, potassium and magnesium, it can reduce inflammation, keep your skin radiant, lower blood pressure and even keep you cool during a heat wave.
Try it dipped in hummus, on a sandwich or in a salad

Carrots
Why it's good Their antioxidant compounds prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease -- and of course, help your vision.
Try it plain when you crave something crunchy or toss some into your juicer with fruit.

Celery
Why it's good Its vitamin C content helps boost the immune system and it also can reduce blood pressure.
Try it with peanut butter or in a low-fat chicken salad

Source: WHFoods.com

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Sodium Shake-down

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Jun 29, 2010
sodium intake and nutritional values

“to shake or not to shake?”

Even if you never use a salt shaker at your meals, you may be ingesting far more sodium than your body needs, putting you at increased risk for high blood pressure (hypertension), strokes, cardiovascular disease and, it’s likely, ulcers and heartburn as well.

Yes, our bodies do need salt. It contains sodium which is an essential mineral. The recommended level for most Americans, which includes children, all African Americans, adults over age 40 and anyone with high blood pressure is 1500 milligrams (mg)/day. The recommended level for those who fall outside these categories is 2300 mg. Most Americans consume 3000-8000 mg/daily! Thus, most Americans are consuming two to five times the amount of sodium needed each day!

Weight Loss Tip: Use WeightLossNYC's Free Online Nutritional Calculator

Health experts have sounded a loud warning: Reducing intake to appropriate levels could save 150,000 lives per year, mostly by preempting high blood pressure.

Laudably, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently announced plans to reduce the amount of sodium in restaurant and processed foods gradually over the next ten years. Will this be enough and fast enough to reverse the effects of high sodium on Americans’ health? It’s certainly a step in the right direction but consumers must also educate themselves and make lower sodium choices.

Most Americans due to time and convenience factors will continue to use some processed foods. The key is to consider the sodium content (as well as fat and calories) on nutritional labels. — A typical example:

  • Tuna fish (half of a 5 oz. can) = 250 mg.
  • 2 slices of whole wheat bread = 150 mg.
  • 1/2 can (7.5 ozs) of Trader Joe’s chicken noodle soup = 730 mg.
  • TOTAL = 1130 mg. which is 75% of most Americans’ daily sodium limit

You can easily imagine eating a bowl, instead of a cup of soup, which means 1460 mg. from soup alone with a total sodium count for this ostensibly healthy lunch (it does include heart healthy fish and low fat soup after all) of 1860 mg.! What if you add a few crackers with this lunch (81 mg. for 3 Ritz crackers) or a pickle (280 mg. for a medium one) with the sandwich? Do you feel your blood pressure rising?

Read More Weight Loss Tips from Dr. Aron, Bariatric Physician

Dining out can be an even greater sodium nightmare. Meals, particularly fast food meals, often contain 5000 mg. or more of sodium. Adding sodium can also be a mask for using less than the freshest produce and other ingredients in processed foods. Add preservatives, some of which include sodium and watch those blood pressure numbers rise.

Eat Fresh, Not Processed, Foods

The antidote: eat fresh, not processed. Fresh fish, meat, poultry and vegetables, prepared simply with a couple shakes of salt and desired herbs provides sound nutrition without excess sodium. Add freshly prepared pasta, beans, rice, quinoa or other whole grains for variety and even greater nutritional value.

Eat Fruit Liberally

Eat fresh fruit liberally. Now is the time the Farmers Markets and grocery stores are stocked with an abundance of fresh peaches, plums, melons, cherries. Low in sodium and high in taste, fruits are easy to snack on and don’t pack the sodium that pretzels and other processed snacks do. In the winter when fresh choices aren’t as plentiful, dried fruit in moderation (watch the calories) can replace some of the recommended 2-5 daily fruit servings.

Plan Your Grocery Shopping

As you plan your grocery shopping, think fresh, fresh, fresh! Planning ahead can also save time, a frequent excuse for not eating more healthily. Leftover chicken breasts from dinner can be tossed into a salad or put in a pita pocket with lettuce and hummus for a low sodium and nutritious lunch. Last night’s leftover fruit salad dessert combined with cottage cheese and unsalted nuts is another healthy option.

Read Nutritional Labels

Be creative and read nutritional labels. Look at cooking magazines and websites for healthy menu options. A little planning goes a long way. Also keep in mind that as your taste buds get used to the taste of fresh and not processed, food will taste better, while treating your body better. Eating fresh will also usually mean keeping your calories and cholesterol in check. And your waistline.

Learn more about WeightLossNYC's Diet Plans

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Sugar, Not Caffeine Raises Blood Pressure

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Jun 7, 2010

If you’ve experienced elevated blood pressure and have no clue what caused it, you may have to take a look at your daily soda intake.

New research now shows that the sugar in soda – and not caffeine – may be the cause of increased blood pressure. In a dietary and blood pressure study of 810 adults, it was found that reducing intake of sugar-spiked soda to one serving per day led to a significant blood pressure drop in 18 months. Overall, those in the study who drank less soda had lower blood pressure levels.

High blood pressure typically has few symptoms and is a risk factor for stroke, cardiovascular disease, kidney failure and shortened life expectancy. Limiting sugary drinks to one per day is recommended until further research can effectively pinpoint the causal link of raised blood pressure.

—BeverageDaily

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Childhood Obesity Tripled

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Sep 18, 2009
childhood obesityChildhood obesity is not only on the rise -- it's tripled over the past 25 years.

According to a report in Academic Pediatrics by an obesity expert at Brenner Children’s Hospital, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, children are not just becoming overweight and obese. Many more are becoming severely obese, which can greatly impact their health. Severe childhood obesity is classified as a child with a body mass index (BMI) that's at least or greater than the 99th percentile for age and gender.

Researchers found the following facts in the study:
  • Severe obesity among children jumped from 0.8 percent in 1976-80 compared to 3.8 percent in 1999-2004. There are now more than 2.7 million severely obese children in the U.S.

  • The highest increases in severe childhood obesity occurred among blacks and Mexican-Americans and those who live below the poverty level. Severe obesity rates for Mexican-American children went from 0.9 percent in 1976-80 to 5.2 percent in 1999-2004.

  • A third of the children considered severely obese were classified as having metabolic syndrome, which is a group of risk factors such as higher-than normal blood pressure, cholesterol and insulin levels that make them more susceptible to experiencing heart attack, stroke and diabetes.
--ScienceDaily

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Top 3 Preventable Causes of Death Include Being Overweight

Author: Oksana Aron, MD Source: Weight Loss NYC Apr 29, 2009
A study recently published in PLoS Medicine led by the Harvard School of Public, in conjunction with the University of Toronto and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, is the most comprehensive to date taking into consideration how diet, lifestyle and metabolic chronic disease contribute to mortality in the U.S.

The results found that many of these factors include dietary and lifestyle risk factors that are preventable. The number of deaths that occur in the U.S. annually are attributed to the following risk factors listed below -- all of which were considered premature or preventable.

Smoking: 467,000

High blood pressure: 395,000

Overweight-obesity: 216,000

Inadequate physical activity and inactivity: 191,000

High blood sugar: 190,000

High LDL cholesterol: 113,000

High dietary salt: 102,000

Low dietary omega-3 fatty acids (seafood): 84,000

High dietary trans fatty acids: 82,000

Alcohol use: 64,000 (alcohol use averted a balance of 26,000 deaths from heart disease, stroke and diabetes, because moderate drinking reduces risk of these diseases. But these deaths were outweighed by 90,000 alcohol-related deaths from traffic and other injuries, violence, cancers and a range of other diseases).

Low intake of fruits and vegetables: 58,000

Low dietary poly-unsaturated fatty acids: 15,000


The study was the first of its kind to look at a wide range of contributing risk factors, including diet, lifestyle, smoking, alcohol and metabolic factors of the U.S. population, and to figure how many deaths were a result of each risk factor.

Source: PhysOrg.com; April 28, 2009

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