Showing posts with label emotional eating. Show all posts
Showing posts with label emotional eating. Show all posts

Jun 19, 2015

Dining Out Doesn't Have to Be Dangerous

Weight Loss Tips for Dining Out

Nationwide statistics show Americans dining out for almost 1/3 of their meals, with almost 1/2 of their food budget spent at these establishments.[1]

Given our tendency to dine out, it is worthwhile to consider ways you can manage and maintain your weight loss dieting program on the go. Some simple guidelines follow, as well as some links to some of our more popular posts past:

healthy dining out

Simple Tips for Planning Ahead

  • Avoid unlimited buffets and junk food franchises. Salad bars are good if you choose the healthy staple items not the dangerous ones.
  • Cater to places with extended menus to help you find healthy choices you will like. Favor seafood and salad places for healthier fare. Soups can be good, but know what you are choosing. Ask.
  • Best to plan ahead to dine out instead of splurging on surprise outings. Consider reviewing online menu before going so you will know what you will have.
  • Focus on eating for nutrition, not as a social activity. Make reservations to manage your cravings and limit the temptations to drink and snack while waiting. You can even have some small healthy crudite before leaving home to settle your stomach.
  • Stay away from large portions and fried food places. Know what is reasonable for you to eat and enjoy with your diet.
  • Consider sharing entrees with friends to manage your portions. Don’s be shy about tossing aside bread and extra carbs. Send away any extra munchies the waiter puts on your table. Only eat what you intend to eat.
  • As always, start to drink water as soon as you arrive and while waiting for meal.
  • Ask your server about options — extra salad instead of a heavier side dish. Bring your own dressing if you want to be sure of low calories. Add veggies to your entree to fill you up and slow you down.

Power Tips — Know your Menu Vocabulary

  • Bad: Buttery, Breaded, Buttered, Fried, Pan-Fried, Creamed, Scalloped, Au Gratin.
  • Better: Grilled, Baked, Steamed, Broiled, Poached, Stir-Fried, Roasted, Blackened.
  • Avoid: Cream sauces, made with milk, mayonnaise, cheese or oil.
  • Look for tomato based sauces instead. Order all sauces on the side and use sparingly.

Follow Your Diet Plan

As always, follow the diet guidelines presented to you by Dr. Aron. She will have told you your calorie limits and suggested foods for you to enjoy and avoid. Fill up on water, salad and vegetables first. Focus on your friends more than the food. Slow down and pace yourself so you can enjoy your meal and not be left hungry and crave more. Your body also needs time to recognize the food in your system to trigger satisfaction. It is also more than OK to leave the table a little hungry. You never need to stuff yourself, be gentle to your body.

Looking for More Motivation to Lose Weight?

Align with Dr. Aron at WeightLossNYC™ and start losing weight today. Call 718-491-5525 or visit WeightLossNYC.com

Sources: [1] USDA, National Restaurant Association. Adapted from Sparkpeople

Mar 9, 2012

Dine Out and Still Keep the Weight Off


Frequent dining out at restaurants can pack on the pounds and lead to obesity, but there is a way to counter the weight gain: mindful eating.

A study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found in their six-week meditative study called "Mindful Restaurant Eating" that female participants actually lost weight when dining out.

Here are the facts from the study:

Overall, 35 perimenopausal women aged 40 to 59 years of age were studied. On average, the intervention group lost 1.7 kg (3.7 lbs) during six weeks while eating out one to two times a week. They also reduced their daily caloric intake by about 297 calories after completing the intervention...

Participants learned how to plan before dining out and calculate fat and protein counts in restaurant meals. They also did meditative exercises that focus on sight, smell and texture of food to enhance enjoyment and focus on hunger, satisfaction and what their triggers are.

What these meditative exercises involved were simply using sound judgment and being aware of your body in order to lose or maintain weight. No meditation is necessary, but if you pay attention to your hunger -- and eat to satisfy yourself, not out of boredom or emotion -- and be mindful of what you eat, you will be on your way to a trimmer you.

Learn how to lose weight the smart way. Make your first appointment with WeightLossNYC today. Call 718-491-5525!

Source: NYDailyNews.com

Dec 23, 2011

Emotional Eating and Weight Gain



The days are getting shorter and the holidays will soon be far behind us. During the winter months, many people turn to food for comfort and wind up gaining weight. Are you an emotional eater? Find the reasons behind emotional eating and learn how to avoid the weight gain that comes with it.

What is emotional eating?
Eating impulsively when in emotional distress

Why we emotional eat
To deal with and distract yourself from negative emotions such as fear, stress, anger, sadness and loneliness

What it does

It can cause you to gain weight because you may eat too fast when emotional or you eat too much because you are distracted by the negative emotions. It can also cause you to feel even worse over the resulting weight loss, which can trigger an ugly cycle of overeating and feeling bad.

How to get help
-Learn effective ways to cope with your stress, be it everyday stress or a major stressful event in life.
-Find something to do when you get bored instead of reaching for food. Go for a walk, do a craft or clean the house.
-Eat a healthy diet and don't deprive or starve yourself into losing weight. It takes time, so don't stress yourself out about it!
-Get therapy if you find yourself unable to deal with the cause of your emotional eating.
-Make an appointment with Dr. Aron to address your emotional eating and get on a path to weight loss success.

Source: Mayo Clinic