Showing posts with label organic food. Show all posts
Showing posts with label organic food. Show all posts

Jan 17, 2013

Keep an eye out for Antioxidants

The Eyes have it

nutrition for yours eyes

Eating more fruits and vegetables can help protect against disease and improve your overall health. Not all foods contain significant amounts of nutrients you need. Nutritional balance of essential nutrients benefits many systems including these vitamins and minerals found to be most helpful for your eyes:

Antioxidant Types Foods Rich in Antioxidants
Lutein & Zeaxanthin Eggs, kale, spinach, turnip greens, collard greens,romaine lettuce, broccoli, zucchini, corn, garden peas, Brussels sprouts.
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) Red berries, kiwi, red and green bell peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, spinach, and juices made from guava, grapefruit, and orange.
Vitamin E Vegetable oils, nuts, green leafy vegetables, sweet potatoes, avocados, wheat germ, and whole grains.
Vitamin A & Beta Carotene Carrots, sweet potatoes, squash, eggs, green leafy vegetables.
Essential Fatty Acids Salmon, sardines, flax seeds, soybeans, walnuts.
Zinc Red meat, poultry, oysters and other seafood, nuts, dried beans, soy foods, milk and other dairy products, whole grains, fortified breakfast cereals.

Omega Fatty Acids: DHA and EPA

Dr.  recommends Omega complex for its well known health benefits. Listed below are some popular cooked fish selections to consider (highest to lowest available omegas). Non-fish folk can supplement DHA with commercial supplements made from microalgae.

Omega Source Portion Yield
Salmon 3 oz 1800mg
Tuna 3 oz 1300mg
Mackerel 3 oz 1000mg
Anchovy 2 oz (1 can in oil) 900mg
Trout 3 oz 800mg
Halibut 3 oz 400mg
Scallops 100g 350mg
Snapper 3 oz 1800mg
Salmon 3 oz 300mg

Medical Weight Loss and Nutritional Health

Maintaining nutritional health is an essential part of a safe and effective weight loss program. For more information, read about +Dr Aron Medical Weight Loss Center at WeightLossNYC.com or call 718-491-5525

Abbreviations:

  • DHA: Docosahexaenoic Acid
  • EPA: Eicosapentaenoic Acid

Sources:

  • New York State Department of Health [health.ny.gov]
  • American Optometric Association [aoa.org]

Apr 1, 2011

Eat More Food Without Labels ... Especially Plants

Don't Judge a Box by its Cover

Nutritional labels on prepared foods are meant to guide consumers in making healthy choices. What has evolved in recent years are scores of empty and misleading claims requiring time and perhaps a college degree to decipher which foods really are “good for you.”

Common misleading food labeling includes empty claims that imply health benefits which have no backing. Among these are “Made with natural flavor,” “Doctor recommended,” and “Made with natural goodness.”

Some claims are accurate but don't give the consumer additional information such as pasta packages labeled “no cholesterol” — Plain pasta does not contain cholesterol! More misleading are labels such as on Edy's Dibs Bite Sized Snacks. They boast “0 grams of trans fat!” giving the impression that these chocolate covered morsels of ice cream are heart healthy when in fact a serving contains 16 grams of saturated fat. The Center for Science in the Public Interest recommends that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prohibit companies from boasting of “0 grams trans fat” on products with more than one gram of saturated food per serving.

Don't Believe the Hype

Many labels for fruit-flavored items suggest that products offer the health benefits of fresh fruit when in reality, real fruit is found in small quantities if at all. Gerber Graduates Juice Treats-marketed for preschoolers- depict six different fruits on the package. The product actually contains grape juice concentrate and less than two percent raspberry and apple juice concentrate. The main ingredients are corn syrup and sugar, 17 grams worth, or about four teaspoons of refined sugars per serving.
obesity weight loss scale
One of the most widely used claims capitalizes on the food pyramid's recommendation that “at least half of recommended total grain intake should be whole grains.”[5] Bread, cereal, cracker and even cookie packages often feature their whole grain and high fiber content. Yet these products often have refined flour as the first ingredient and a minimal amount of whole grains. Furthermore, a number of products which claim to be good sources of fiber are peddling fiber not from traditional sources such as whole grains, beans, vegetables or fruit, but from “isolated fibers” made from chicory root or purified powders of polydextrose and other substances. Unlike traditional sources of fiber, isolated fibers have not been shown to lower blood sugar or cholesterol, two of the key benefits of eating fiber.[3].

Kellogg's Froot Loops cereal boxes tout “Good Source of FIBER & Made with WHOLE GRAIN.” (A green leaf adorns the ampersand further fostering the image of healthy food.) While Froot Loops boxes list whole grains among the first five ingredients, the first ingredient is sugar. Ditto for many cereals and cookies labeled “made with whole grains.“

While the Center for Science in the Public Interest continues to urge the FDA to crack down on false and misleading food labeling, consumers can take proactive steps towards better nutrition. Read labels discriminately. When faced with choices among products (such as different yogurts), compare the nutritional facts and choose products with less saturated and trans fats and sugar, fewer artificial ingredients, and more nutrients such as protein and vitamins.

Eat more foods without labels, the foods your great-grandparents would recognize. As food guru Michael Pollan says, “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”
– Healthcare Author, Sima Michaels Dembo

Reference:
  1. Center for the Science in the Public Interest, www.cspinet.org/new/200912291.html
  2. Niman, Nicolette Hahn “Defending 'Foodies': A Rancher Takes a Bite out of B.R. Myers,“ February 17, 2011, www.the atlantic.com/life/archive
  3. Parker-Pope, Tara, “Six Meaningless Claims on Food Labels,“ New York Times, January 28, 2010.
  4. Wikipedia, Nutritional Facts Label
  5. DietaryGuidelines.com

Aug 28, 2010

Organic Junk Food Is Just as Bad


Organic cookies, gummy bears and ice cream can now be found at grocery stores everywhere. Eating healthy organic food is healthier for you, but organic junk food is where things get tricky. Many people trying to lose weight mistakenly think organic junk food is permissible -- even healthy -- but they are just as bad for you as traditional junk food.

Researchers in the Department of Psychology at University of Michigan found that when faced with an organic junk food item vs. a non-organic junk food item, consumers seemed to think the organic version had less calories and was less fattening even though that was not correct. There is also a misconception that "organic" equals "healthy," which isn't necessarily true.

This is important for those watching their weight, especially as consumer interest in organic food rises.

When grocery shopping, read the nutrition facts and ingredients and watch for the following things to make healthier choices (whether organic or not):

*How many calories does it have?
*How much saturated fat?
*How much sodium?
*How much cholesterol?
*How much sugar?

It's okay to occasionally indulge in an organic junk food item -- just exercise caution (and don't forget to do physical exercise, either!). Even though an organic snack is made with organic unbleached flour and organic sugar it still can make you gain weight, especially if those calories are not used up.

Source: Judgment and Decision Making, Vol. 5, No. 3, June 2010, pp. 144–150