Showing posts with label hypertension. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hypertension. Show all posts

Oct 13, 2018

What Type of Diet is Right for You? Mediterranean? Ketogenic? Vegan?

Green Vegetable

Fact not Fad

There is no shortage of diet names to confuse us all. We want to be healthy and want to go beyond just a gimmick or trend. Dr Aron surely knows fact from fad, she prescribes diets to all her patients. So here are some simple facts about what makes a diet healthy, and why it should matter to you.

“Diet is the single most significant risk factor for disability and premature death.” — American Family Physician

Well … That seems like a pretty good reason to care about your diet.

be happy and healthy


Diet Characteristics

Across the board evaluation of clinically viable food plans favor higher percentage of vegetables, limiting sugars, and replacing processed grains with whole grain sources. Important to note is that juices are not considered a proper replacement for real fruits and vegetables due to their higher glycemic index and loss of healthy fiber in processing. Likewise, potatoes fall into the carb camp not as veggies.

Making the proper substitutions can be challenging yet the clinical outcomes are meaningful in that your diet can push back on risk factors for cardio-vascular diseases, high blood pressure, obesity, and of course, diabetes.


healthy lifestyle choices


What to do next

Fundamentally, maintaining proper nutrition is key, via proper balanced diet and appropriate food choices. Dr Aron can advise you of any items you are not sure if suitable for your weight loss progress as well as for your life.

Visit her medical practice at WeightLossNYC.com to learn more.






Sources: American Family Physician; Twitter author jokes

Jul 26, 2012

Qsymia, Another Anti-Obesity Diet Drug Approved by FDA

women weight loss

New weight loss pill


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration just recently approved another prescription medical weight loss drug, Qsymia (previously named Qnexa), which is said to produce significant weight loss.

Qsymia: The facts


In clinical trials, patients experienced a more dramatic weight loss with Qsymia than with Belviq, another weight loss drug that recently got FDA approval. Patients in the trial went from an average of 227 pounds to 204 pounds while on Qsymia. Those on Belviq went from an average of 220 to 207.

Meant for obese or overweight patients with a BMI of 27 or greater who suffer from hypertension and diabetes, Qsymia's benefits include lowered blood pressure and cholesterol levels in obese people and less chance of getting Type 2 diabetes while on the drug. It also contains phentermine, an appetite suppressant.

Possible side effects include an increased heart rate and birth defects when taken by pregnant women. Qsymia is expected to be available soon, while its manufacturer, Vivus, will conduct a study on its cardiovascular effects, as required by the FDA.

Consult with Dr Aron

Speak with Dr. Aron before trying any weight loss pills to find what's safe and works best for you.

Call WeightLossNYC™ today at 718-491-5525 for your first appointment with a knowledgeable medical weight loss physician, Oksana Aron MD.



Source: cnn.com

Image: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Jun 29, 2010

Sodium Shake-down

sodium intake and nutritional values

“to shake or not to shake?”

Even if you never use a salt shaker at your meals, you may be ingesting far more sodium than your body needs, putting you at increased risk for high blood pressure (hypertension), strokes, cardiovascular disease and, it’s likely, ulcers and heartburn as well.

Yes, our bodies do need salt. It contains sodium which is an essential mineral. The recommended level for most Americans, which includes children, all African Americans, adults over age 40 and anyone with high blood pressure is 1500 milligrams (mg)/day. The recommended level for those who fall outside these categories is 2300 mg. Most Americans consume 3000-8000 mg/daily! Thus, most Americans are consuming two to five times the amount of sodium needed each day!

Weight Loss Tip: Use WeightLossNYC's Free Online Nutritional Calculator

Health experts have sounded a loud warning: Reducing intake to appropriate levels could save 150,000 lives per year, mostly by preempting high blood pressure.

Laudably, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently announced plans to reduce the amount of sodium in restaurant and processed foods gradually over the next ten years. Will this be enough and fast enough to reverse the effects of high sodium on Americans’ health? It’s certainly a step in the right direction but consumers must also educate themselves and make lower sodium choices.

Most Americans due to time and convenience factors will continue to use some processed foods. The key is to consider the sodium content (as well as fat and calories) on nutritional labels. — A typical example:

  • Tuna fish (half of a 5 oz. can) = 250 mg.
  • 2 slices of whole wheat bread = 150 mg.
  • 1/2 can (7.5 ozs) of Trader Joe’s chicken noodle soup = 730 mg.
  • TOTAL = 1130 mg. which is 75% of most Americans’ daily sodium limit

You can easily imagine eating a bowl, instead of a cup of soup, which means 1460 mg. from soup alone with a total sodium count for this ostensibly healthy lunch (it does include heart healthy fish and low fat soup after all) of 1860 mg.! What if you add a few crackers with this lunch (81 mg. for 3 Ritz crackers) or a pickle (280 mg. for a medium one) with the sandwich? Do you feel your blood pressure rising?

Read More Weight Loss Tips from Dr. Aron, Bariatric Physician

Dining out can be an even greater sodium nightmare. Meals, particularly fast food meals, often contain 5000 mg. or more of sodium. Adding sodium can also be a mask for using less than the freshest produce and other ingredients in processed foods. Add preservatives, some of which include sodium and watch those blood pressure numbers rise.

Eat Fresh, Not Processed, Foods

The antidote: eat fresh, not processed. Fresh fish, meat, poultry and vegetables, prepared simply with a couple shakes of salt and desired herbs provides sound nutrition without excess sodium. Add freshly prepared pasta, beans, rice, quinoa or other whole grains for variety and even greater nutritional value.

Eat Fruit Liberally

Eat fresh fruit liberally. Now is the time the Farmers Markets and grocery stores are stocked with an abundance of fresh peaches, plums, melons, cherries. Low in sodium and high in taste, fruits are easy to snack on and don’t pack the sodium that pretzels and other processed snacks do. In the winter when fresh choices aren’t as plentiful, dried fruit in moderation (watch the calories) can replace some of the recommended 2-5 daily fruit servings.

Plan Your Grocery Shopping

As you plan your grocery shopping, think fresh, fresh, fresh! Planning ahead can also save time, a frequent excuse for not eating more healthily. Leftover chicken breasts from dinner can be tossed into a salad or put in a pita pocket with lettuce and hummus for a low sodium and nutritious lunch. Last night’s leftover fruit salad dessert combined with cottage cheese and unsalted nuts is another healthy option.

Read Nutritional Labels

Be creative and read nutritional labels. Look at cooking magazines and websites for healthy menu options. A little planning goes a long way. Also keep in mind that as your taste buds get used to the taste of fresh and not processed, food will taste better, while treating your body better. Eating fresh will also usually mean keeping your calories and cholesterol in check. And your waistline.

Learn more about WeightLossNYC's Diet Plans

Feb 15, 2010

Fewer Carbs Lower Blood Pressure

sandwich
A low-carb diet can fight fat. Eating fewer carbohydratess can also lower your blood pressure — and it can be even more effective than weight loss drugs.

This new research from Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Duke University Medical Center demonstrates that it's very possible to get the same results without weight loss drugs, and without risk of potential side effects or extra cost.

The news also comes as a major benefit to those with hypertension that are trying to shed pounds. 146 overweight individuals involved in the study were broken into two groups: one that followed a low-carb diet and another that took orlistat while on a low-fat diet. 47% in the low-carb group had their blood pressure medication decreased or discontinued, while 21% of the low-fat, orlistat group had to reduce their medication.
—ScienceDaily

Learn more about obesity.