Showing posts with label peer pressure. Show all posts
Showing posts with label peer pressure. Show all posts

Aug 1, 2013

10 ways you Eat for the Wrong Reasons


Weight Loss Motivation is in your hands

Dr. Aron counsels her patients to be aware of ways they may be tempted to eat when actual hunger or mealtime isn’t the way.

Some of her popular weight loss tips including drinking water to see if you’ really hungry. “Thirst often masks itself as hunger,‘ remarks Dr. Aron.

“Drink water to see if you’re really hungry.
Thirst often masks itself as hunger.”
Oksana Aron, M.D.

Check Yourself: Overeating Traps and Pitfalls

Some of the subliminal ways you may find yourself nibbling when you naught:

  • Coping mechanism
  • Boredom
  • Other People Are Eating
  • Food is There
  • A Special Occasion or celebration
  • You’re Tired
  • Because the Clock Says So
  • Free or inexpensive snacks/meals
  • You Can't Say No to Food Pushers
  • You Suffer from Clean Plate Syndrome

Doctor Supervised Weight Loss Program

Whether you’re looking to overcome a lifetime of obesity or to focus on losing post-baby weight gain, wedding weight loss, or other health or lifestyle syndromes, give WeightLossNYC™ a call and see how you can achieve your weight loss goals today:

Call 718-491-5525

Weight Loss NYC Patient Testimonial

Antoinette tells you what she loves about and her .


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List adapted from yahoo news

Apr 10, 2013

What is raspberry ketone?

Raspberry Ketones and Weight Loss

raspberry ketones

Pop culture Dr. Oz and others cheer on support for raspberry ketone as a natural weight loss supplement. Dr Jennifer Seger from the American Society of Bariatric Physicians offers this response:

“Raspberry ketone [4-(4-hydroxyphenyl) butan-2-one] or rheosmin, is a compound extracted from raspberries, blackberries, peaches, apples, rhubarb, grapes and the bark of some trees. It is similar in molecular structure to capsaicin (found in chili peppers) and synephrine (found in bitter orange trees)- two compounds that are thought to exert anti-obesity actions and alter lipid metabolism. It is hypothesized that the method in which raspberry ketone helps with weight loss is related to an increase in norepinephrine-induced lipolysis. The data supporting this claim is extremely sparse. After searching various online medical and scientific databases, I found less than a handful of studies specifically related to raspberry ketone and weight loss, two of which are rodent studies. One study suggests that when rats were fed a high-fat diet with raspberry ketone, there was prevention of fat storage and increased lipolysis in the liver compared to the control group on a high-fat diet 1. An in vitro study had a similar finding in that when adipocytes were incubated with raspberry ketone, there was an increase in lipolysis and fat oxidation, suggesting that this compound may aid in limiting fat accumulation2. It is important to note, however, that no studies have been conducted in humans to elucidate the effect of raspberry ketone on in vivo lipolysis and fat oxidation. Raspberry ketone has been used in cosmetics and as a food additive for decades, and in its "natural" state, it is quite expensive. Nowadays, raspberry ketone is primarily synthesized in a lab and is a very inexpensive additive for the aforementioned purposes. The safety data, though quite limited, do not reveal any significant concerns but there are no large studies regarding this. With a combination of extremely limited efficacy and safety data, substantial health benefit claims, a population desperate for results and large profit margins, it is no wonder that raspberry ketone is one of the top-selling nutrition supplements on the market right now. At this point, though, the use of raspberry ketone can be based on only anecdotal experience and insufficient scientific data. Hence, I currently cannot recommend the use of this supplement.”

Read more about Raspberries and weight loss

raspberriesImage source Fotopedia.com [items/flickr-225231412]

Jul 11, 2011

How often do you eat when not hungry?

Are You Eating to Satisfy Non-Hunger Needs?

Dr. Aron admonishes snacking, favoring proper nutritional meals as the signpost to health and happy weight loss. Her prescription for traditional meals favors real table time with place settings and people.
“Building and keeping a structure to your meals maintains a signal to yourself to relax and eat normally, rather than snatch and grab snacking when under duress. [Furthermore] providing a healthy outlet for socialization helps you manage daily stress and foster stronger relationship and communication bonds.”
Dr. Aron, Weight Loss Expert

Honest Food Needs and Fumbles

Many of the reasons people eat do not relate to true physical hunger. Being aware of physical and emotional needs and eating triggers is a step towards addressing them constructively. Dr. Aron can provide support in learning to address physical and emotional needs in non-food ways.

lose weight for your wedding

Address Your Physical Needs

  • Tend to your health needs. Discuss with Dr. Aron if you have a pain or problem. Follow your treatment plan. Take your medication(s).
  • Drink 6-8 glasses of water per day. You may need more on hot days, after exercise or eating salty foods, or based on medications you may be taking. Often people confuse hunger with thirst.
  • Get enough sleep. It has been documented that lack of sleep makes some people eat more.
  • Move your body. Human bodies are designed to move. After years of cutting back on requirements for physical exercise, the current recommendation is to exercise for a minimum of 30 minutes/day.
  • Make exercise fun. If exercise isn't your thing, combine it with meeting other needs such as:
    • Socialization. Bike or walk with a friend. Take a class with a partner. Join a softball league. Learn a new dance.
    • Spiritual. Yoga or walking at the beach can feel spiritually satisfying.
    • Fresh air. Take a 20-30 minute walk—even in winter. Choose a sunny or less cold day, bundle up and walk. It clears your head, leaving you energized.
    • Care-taking. Take your children on a hike. Walk or run with your dog.
    • Personal Growth. Try a new sport. Take swimming or tennis lessons.

Satisfy Your Emotional Needs

healthy eating habits
Listen to your inner voice and work on giving yourself what you need. Everyone needs the following to varying degrees:
  • Companionship/socialization. Spend time with people you love and enjoy; connect with them often. Eliminate (or minimize if that's not possible) contact with people you feel bad or stressed around.
  • Time to be alone. This may include sitting in silence for ten minutes per day.
  • Spend time doing what you love. If you can't do this every day, make some time every week.
  • Find constructive ways of dealing with interpersonal conflict. Take a class or read a book on what ails you. See a therapist or other healer if you need support.
  • Identify your stresses and find coping mechanisms. Try new ways of coping if you still feel overwhelmed.
  • Pay attention to and work on eliminating negative thought patterns. Re-program negative thoughts such as
    "I'm never as good as X"
    into
    "I'm learning _____."

Healthy Lifestyle is Your Choice

Healthy eating is a lifestyle choice. A physically and emotionally tuned in you will create more positive outlets and feel less need to overeat.

Start Losing Weight Today

You can lose 10-20 lbs per month safely and easily under Dr. Aron's care and supervision. Her medical weight loss plan is fast and effective, and backed by FDA clinical approval.

Call for your first appointment, 718-491-5525

Sep 8, 2010

When Cartoon Characters Sell Your Kids on Junk Food



Junk food is not only a hotly-debated topic between moms and children, it's a topic of interest to scientists as well. Researchers at Yale’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity wanted to find out how popular cartoon characters on the packing influenced children’s snacking preferences, and the results they published in Pediatrics in June are eye-opening.

40 children between the ages of 4 and 6 involved in the study were given 3 pairs of snacks (graham crackers, fruit gummy snacks and carrots). Each pair of snacks was identical -- except the packaging, which either had cartoon characters on it or not.

The children were then asked which snacks they liked better, and food items with the cartoon characters were mostly preferred, even though both choices were the same. When presented with the carrots, however, the children weren’t as swayed by the veggies with cartoon characters on them.

The findings then urged the restriction of using cartoon characters to advertise unhealthful junk food items to children. It’s also a wake-up call to parents to pay closer attention to such snack items aimed at children with their beloved characters on them.

Below are more food and obesity facts regarding children reported in the study:

• Obesity rates for children between ages 2 and 5 have more than doubled since the 1970s; among 6- to 11-year-olds, rates have more than tripled.
• Food and beverage companies spend more than $1.6 billion in advertising per year targeting young consumers.
• Based on the findings, children perceived the food items with licensed characters to taste better than those that came in plain packaging.

Source: NYTimes.com, YaleRudderCenter.org

Aug 10, 2010

Would you like to appear on the Rachael Ray show?

Call WeightLossNYC Today

rachael ray weight loss

Popular media mogul Rachael Ray contacted us to help them find guests for an upcoming show about weight loss. We respect your privacy and offer you the opportunity to request your possible inclusion in the show by calling WeightLossNYC today for details on what is happening with weight loss in the media today.

Sep 7, 2009

Your Social Circle Can Make or Break Your Dieting Habits

There is strength in numbers when it comes to getting the support you need from those closest to you, like family and friends, and it's especially important to your diet and overall health.

We previously blogged about how children are more likely to eat more when dining with friends who consume more calories, based on a study of teens and tweens published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In the same vein, there is further research that shows obesity can be contagious.

In a 2007 study spanning 32 years of a social network of 12,000 adults conducted by Harvard researcher Nicholas Christakis and fellow colleagues, it was found that a person is 37 percent more likely to be obese if a spouse is, 40 percent more likely if a sibling is and 57 percent more likely if a friend is.

The reasoning behind these facts is that adults eat more in the presence of family and friends than with strangers, and that socializing with overweight individuals can affect their perceptions of what the norm is regarding eating habits.

Finally, there's the idea that we just like to hang with people that are like ourselves. Cornell food sociologist Jeffrey Sobal explains that "especially among two overweight people, there's a sort of permission-giving going on. We're encouraging each other to eat more."


Wanting to be proactive about losing weight doesn't mean dropping overweight friends because making the decision to eat healthier can just as easily influence those around you to do the same.

--TIME

Aug 23, 2009

Can Peers Push Kids to Eat More?

Peer pressure can be a powerful force, but does that also influence eating habits? A childhood obesity study recently found that friends can influence the amount of food you eat, and that includes overeating.

23 overweight and 42 normal weight children between the ages of 9 and 15 were involved in the study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition were paired in groups of familiar and unfamiliar children. Each pair sat in a room for 45 minutes with bowls of low-calorie snacks such as baby carrots and grapes and high-calorie snacks such as potato chips and cookies. The children were told to eat as many snacks as they wanted from their own bowls.

The friends who ate together were found to eat more than pairs who didn't know each other. Friends were also found to eat similar amounts of food compared with the participants who ate with a stranger. When overweight children were paired with other overweight children, whether they knew the other person or not, ate more than the overweight children who ate with a normal weight child.

Sarah Salvy, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Division of Behavioral Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences told the ScienceDaily that "both overweight and normal weight participants eating with a friend ate significantly more than did participants eating in the presence of an unfamiliar peer. These results are consistent with research in adults, which showed that eating among friends and family is distinctly different than eating among strangers." --ScienceDaily