Showing posts with label breastfeeding. Show all posts
Showing posts with label breastfeeding. Show all posts

Oct 17, 2012

3 Weight Gain Facts for Women

overweight woman

Women and weight gain

For women, weight gain happens throughout all life stages, but each stage contains its own set of reasons and risk factors. Here, we explain from puberty on through menopause how and why women may gain weight--and how you can use that knowledge to your advantage to keep off the weight.

Puberty

  • The earlier a girl starts puberty, the more likely she is to be overweight or obese as an adult. If she starts her period before age 11, she is likely to weight between 9 and 11 pounds more than another woman who started hers after age 14. Additionally, as many as 26 percent of women who started puberty early were considered obese by age 30 compared with 15 percent of the other women.
  • It's difficult to imagine weight gain as a problem during childhood, but the childhood obesity epidemic proves this is an important time to start healthy diet and exercise habits that will last throughout the child's adult life. It's never too early to start. In fact, the earlier you start your child on a road to healthy living, the better!

Pregnancy

  • Weight gain is expected during pregnancy, but you still have to proceed with caution and be careful not to gain an excessive amount of weight. Gaining 25 to 35 pounds during pregnancy is usually the goal. Typically, a pregnant woman will gain 2 to 4 pounds in the first trimester, then 1 pound per week after that, but it depends on the woman's pre-pregnancy weight because 1 pound per week may be too much for some. Your doctor will give you guidance on what your ideal weight during pregnancy should be.
  • After pregnancy, many women's bodies will hold on to 5 pounds of that gained weight, which may never be shed, but they generally will lose about 10 pounds immediately following delivery. They can lose 5 pounds a month in the next couple of months depending on the following factors: breastfeeding, diet and exercise level. By staying active, getting exercise, eating a healthy diet and breastfeeding, you can lose weight faster and easier.

Menopause

  • Two thirds of women are overweight by the time they reach their 50s. A drop in estrogen production is a possible cause, which causes the body to store fat, making weight loss more difficult.
  • Weight loss can be more challenging for women after menopause, so it's important to seek the help of your doctor to ensure you're getting proper nutrition, exercise and remain in overall good health. By doing all of the above, you're increasing your chance of maintaining a healthy weight and leading a healthier, happier life.

Fast Weight Loss help

Find answers to your questions on weight loss, weight control, nutrition and more, by visiting Dr. Aron at WeightLossNYC.com; or call to schedule your first appointment with Dr. Aron today at 718-491-5525 and learn new skills for weight loss success today.
Image courtesy of maya picture / FreeDigitalPhotos.net Source: dummies.com

Jun 22, 2010

Michelle Obama Campaigns Against Childhood Obesity

Weight Loss Diet Plan
pregnant woman

First Lady Michelle Obama will fight childhood obesity with the newly launched Let's Move! campaign. Her goal is to greatly reduce childhood obesity rates by 2030 — and doing so begins at home, in the school cafeterias and even in the womb.

A new report by the White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity lists 70 different recommendations and tips for families to implement, including information on prenatal care, breastfeeding, quality school lunches, recreational/physical activities and more.

The following statistics come from the report:

  • one in three children in America are overweight or obese
  • one third of all children born in the year 2000 are expected to develop diabetes
  • obesity rates are highest among non-Hispanic black girls and Hispanic boys
  • the current generation may even be on track to have a shorter lifespan than their parents
Source: LetsMove.gov

Jun 26, 2009

Bottle-Fed Babies At Higher Obesity Risk


A new international study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition claims that breast milk has less protein than formula.

Bottle-fed babies have been believed to be larger and store more fat, making them more susceptible to childhood obesity, and the new study is calling for protein levels in baby formula to drop.

To reach the conclusion, a third were given a low protein content formula milk, a third had a formula with a higher level of protein, while the rest were breast-fed during their first year.

In order to qualify as breast-fed, kids had to be either exclusively given breast milk, or have a maximum of three bottles per week.

Then the infants were followed up to the age of two with regular weight, height and body mass index measurements taken.

At the age of two, there was no difference in height between the groups, but the high protein group were the heaviest.

The researchers suggest lower protein intakes in infancy might protect against later obesity.


The study, which highlights the importance of breast-feeding as well as further research in infant formula composition, will continue to see if the children given lower protein formulas have lesser risks of obesity later in life. —Newspost Online